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the president of the united states is on the ground in afghanistan. of course, we are in afghanistan because the attacks of 9/11 and now we know that president obama is meeting with afghanistan's president karzai, an unannounced and secret visit until this moment. some describe the relationship between our president and president karzai as "complicated." which could be the unstatement of the day. casey in point: a u.s. government released yesterday. new details of the level of corruption in afghanistan. and the unthinkable waste of billions upon billions of american tax dollars. officials in afghanistan are stealing american money according to the report. the afghan attorney general's office avoids prosecuting high profile corruption cases among other things. that's the situation as the president is on the ground if afghanistan our chief white house correspondent is at the white house. did you get any idea of this? and what do we expect to accomplish? >>reporter: the president's schedule was wide open all day leaving the possibility that he could have been going s
's also something going on in the united states but in the united states that process takes on a much different context, and the main reason for that is that in the u.s. you have universal white male suffrage by 1820 unlike in europe where it is france and the 1870s and other countries later on, in the u.s. you have basically full mass democracy very early on and you have it before most immigrants he show up, so when the immigrants begin to be integrated into american society and particularly when they begin to be integrated into american politics, they're being integrated into a much different world than are those immigrants that we talked about in europe. so what i want to do today is talk about how the united states begins to develop a plurist philosophy, a pleuralist vision and i want to trace the roots back to the way politics worked in 19th century america. i have here just to give you a sense of the kind of politics we're talking about, an image from harper's weekly in 1858, around election time or just after election time, in 1858 and shows a saloon and a polling place. they d
the president of the united states turned out to be a dlib fabrication because for sduecury reasons he made a trip under the veil of secrecy. this is standard operating procedure for presidents visiting america's various war zones. shortly after the 2008 election in which he was elected president, after the election but before the new president had been sworn in in december of 2008, then still president george w. bush took one of these surprise trips the, unannounced trips to background. it was december 14th, 2008. that's when this happened. >> yes. everybody calm down for a minute. first of all, thank you for apologizing on behalf of the iraqi people. it doesn't bother me. if you want the facts, it's a size 10 shoe that he threw. >> boy, if you were not surprised enough to find out that the president had surprise, gone to iraq, the president having a shoe hurled at him was definitely a surprise that day. when you look at the official transcript from this, we posted a link to it on our blog tonight. when you go through the transcript of this event, when you get to the part where the guy thr
connolly looks at pluralism in the united states. this 1:15 class took place at ball state university in indiana. >>> on tuesday in class, we looked at the social question in europe. and one of the things we talk about was the ways in which european governments attempted to appease the working classes, alleviate their concerns, reduce social tension. one of the tools they used was mass politics, as we talked about. that's also something that's going on in the united states. but in the united states, that process takes on a much different context. the main reason for that is that in the u.s., you have universal white male suffrage by 1820. unlike in europe where it is france and the 1870s and other countries later on, in the u.s. you have basically full mass democracy very early on and you have it before most immigrants show up, so when the immigrants begin to be integrated into american society and particularly when they begin to be integrated into american politics, they're being integrated into a much different world than are those immigrants that we talked about in europe. so what
was in baghdad was to sign the agreement which committed the united states to end our war in iraq. it was an agreement that president obama then followed through on. the last u.s. troops left iraq in december. today, in afghanistan it was not a status of forces agreement. it was called a strategic partnership agreement between the u.s. and afghan government but the idea is the same. it's to commit both countries to a plan by which the united states will end our war there. >> today i signed an agreement between the united states and afghanistan that defines a new relationship between our countries. a future in which afghans are responsible for the security of their nation and we build an equal partnership between two states. as we move forward some people will ask why we need a firm timeline. the answer is clear. our goal is not to build a country in america's image or to eradicate the taliban. these objectives would require in many years, many more dollars and most importantly many more american lives. our goal is to destroy al qaeda and we on path to do exactly that. afghans want
. it's to commit both countries to a plan by which the united states will end our war there. >> today i signed an agreement between the united states and afghanistan that defines a new relationship between our countries. a future in which afghans are responsible for the security of their nation and we build an equal partnership between two states. as we move forward some people will ask why we need a firm timeline. the answer is clear. our goal is not to build a country in america's image or to eradicate the taliban. these objectives would require in many years, many more dollars and most importantly many more american lives. our goal is to destroy al qaeda and we on path to do exactly that. afghans want to assert their sovereignty and build a lasting peace. the agreement we signed today sends a clear message to the afghan people. as you stand up, you will not stand alone. within this framework we'll work with the afghans to determine what support they need to accomplish two narrow security missions beyond 2014. counter terrorism, and continued training. we will not build permanent base
talks hit major snags. surprise, surprise, the negotiators rejected plans by the united states and five other world powers to curb the rogue nation's nuclear program. iran also insisted it had a right to enrich uranium accusing other nations of creating a "difficult atmosphere for talks." yesterday, officials pointed to signs that iran would be open to an agreement restarting nuclear inspections, but as the talks draw to a close, there is no sign of a deal. u.s. and other world leaders accusative ran of using the program as a cover for building a nuclear bomb. iran claims the program is for peaceful purposes only. and steve is live if us today in baghdad. steve? >>reporter: well, we are getting more details of some of the main goals for the negotiators for the sex -- six powers, with a main goal for iran to stop producing highly enriched uranium. this is the kind of material that can be developed very quickly into fuel for use in a nuclear weapon. >> iran's declared readiness to address the issue of 20 percent enrichment and came with its own five-point plan including their assertion th
century a pluralist philosophy and explanation of what the united states was like. now, basically just there is a lot of different ways to define and understand pluralism and so just for our purposes of fairly straight forward and basic definition of it is a vision of in this case the united states as a country with many different cultures, many different ethnic groups and there isn't one single american identity that everyone has to subscribe to in every way. another way to think about it is the way in which immigrants could identify themselves. they could identify themselves in hyphenated terms as irish american, polish american and italian american and what i want to do today is get at the roots of that identity, the roots of the development of that conception of what the united states is. we're to do it by going through three different sections, three different sets of developments. the first is going to be the world of party politics like the image we just looked at from the period from about 1840 to the end of the 19th century. it is a period when there is very stiff competition
the gaithersburg book festival we hear from david stew wetter on the third vice president of the united states. his called everyone emperor. he he's introduced by john ashman the founder of the gaithersburg book festival. >> surveys are available at the tend. we hope you enjoy the rest of of your day at the festival. [inaudible conversations] good afternoon, everyone. welcome to the third annual gaithersburg book festival. i'm judd ashman a member of the city council. oop. i hope everyone is all right over there. [inaudible conversations] it is a i have i vibrant diversity that celebrates the support of the cultural arts. we're pleased to bring the event free of charge thanks to the generous support of our sponsors. for our consideration and everyone here, i should say, please silence any devices that make any kind of noise at all. in order keep improving the event. we want your feedback. please grab a survey from the table over here. from the info booth it'll be up on the website as of later today. please help us keep improving the event. if there's time for qa please come to the microphone with t
. as the president said, preventing a nuclear iran is in the interest of the united states. we have issued reports, and the most recent one was issued on and.ary 1 and it includes a distinguished panel of four democratic members of congress, admirals' and generals and also experts to area our last report supported the view that the best approached to this challenge is a simultaneous pursuit of a triple track policy, which is of diplomacy, tough sanctions, and a credible and invisible military threat. we also issued a white paper on each of those tracks. i want to highlight one recommendation on each of those tracks, and then i will change it over to mort zuckerman. and the military threat we believe the united states should boost the credibility of its military to air around us nuclear facilities, and we have spelled out how to do so. one element has been selling bunker busters' to israel. we do not advocate an israeli strike, but this will send a strong signal to tehran to negotiate in good faith, encourage other states that the alternative to supporting u.s. sanctions could be military conflict
disruptive not only in a conflict can be destructive to the united states but other countries as well and that is one of the things about military operations in cyberspace with cascading effect that are hard to predict. we have concerns about this and this is why we created joint military platforms like a strategic security dialogue to talk about issues that we feel our potential for friction in the u.s./china relationship. cyber is one of those areas. we don't talk about space, nuclear and missile defense areas as part of the strategic dialogue. >> you mentioned last year spending was almost double what the public acknowledgment was. what things will you give us as examples that they are spending on this year? you did not speculate on the number but what they are spending on this year but not publicly acknowledged? >> we think their nuclear force modernization occurs and research and development money that goes through their defense industry we also think is from a different budget, a different account. some foreign acquisitions come from a different account as well and some local co
. this is a bill for the entire united states of america. it's a bill for the taxpayers, for heavens sake. so senator tester, thank you for your leadership and that of senator vitter and i appreciate senator moran coming on to -- i don't have questions because the questions i would have asked had been asked while i was listening, but thank you very much. let's keep this you and let's redouble our resolve to actually get an accomplishment for the taxpayers and for the american public. >> well, thank you, senator -- >> live now on capitol hill this morning where the senate health committee and senate subcommittee on primary health and ageing is holding a hearing on the cost of hiv/aids drugs. senator bernie sanders has introduced a bill to shorten the time before generics can be made of those drugs. it includes an annual $3 billion prize for hiv/aids drug research. testifying this morning nobel laureate economist joseph stiglitz, harvard law professor lawrence less ig and a number of public health figures. vermont senator bernie sanders is chairing this hearing. he's in the room. this is about
united states senator, a former vice president of the united states, an experienced nationally known sober steady republican named richard nix on is running for president. he wins in 1968. he wins re-election in 1972. he never makes it to the end of the second term because of a little complication called watergate. in 1968 he was at the height of his appeal and he was a communist. see his campaign slogan, forward together. this is from the republican national committee archives. see the slogan at the bottom. bushy haired richard nixon communist. the reason you know that slogan indicates he's a communist because today's conservatives say so. i thought this was debunked already but conservatives even know, this is from last night on glenn beck's internet tv show, conservatives are still stuck on this. president obama's web video that came out ended with this slogan forward. the right just went nuts that the word forward was the obama campaign's way of signaling that it is marxist. it seems to impose the economic system by karl marx on america. that president obama is a communist, that
book, "crusade 2.0", which is about islamic phobia and its effects in the united states, studied by city life, great press. and instead of reading from the book, i thought it was just a presentation for you and for part. the four parts are going to be a visit, a palm, and e-mail and then finally a political ad. let's start with this. a couple weeks ago i went to new york city have visited park 51, an interesting islamic cultural center. and there he saw the different programs they have available. they teach error back, calligraphy. they have a course on capillary, a brazilian martial art. it was a fascinating, it occurs to me, you might not know what i'm talking about because you might not recognize part 51, the action name part 51 because you might be more familiar with the name that was used in the media to describe park 51, which is of course the ground zero mosque. it was two years ago that this islamic cultural center, not a mosque in knoxville is located at ground zero, but several blocks away became the focus of the great controversy. i don't know if you remember that two
states. hispanic children are at the highest level of poverty in the history of the united states. i think the challenge is not how to bring them over to immigration reform or dialogue. just to make sure the latino community knows these facts and understands the failure of president obama. >> i agree with you there is a lot of ammunition. these comments about self deportation have indicated to some in the community he does not have respect for them. go to south texas and talk to latino ranch and farm owners and small businesses and members of the hispanic community. they are hard asses because they are the first to feel the adverse affect. cartels are shooting at them. are competing for jobs. there are a lot of reasons why they are hard asses but they do want to know the presidential candidate has respect for the community and in recognition this is not all a mexican problem. half the people here illegally came from hong kong the, nigeria on a visa and overstating it. the fact that all the people from central america are unworthy is a real problem. >> thank you. >> we will get behind
million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations t
.se it really is a question of thestioof future economic policy of the united states. un that's what we're talking aboutre here today. tay i just. heard the republican leader say there is no budget. i really -- i don't know how to say sometimes i wonder if colleagues pay attention to what they're here. voting on here. last in here in august we didn't pass a budget resolution pass a budget resolution. instead, we passed in a resolution is purely a congressional it never goes toresident the president for his signature has to pass both bodies and be signed by the president. last year, instead of a budget resolution, we did a budget law called the budget control act. the budget control act set the budget for the next two years for this year and next. more than that, it set ten years of spending caps, saving $900 billion. madam president in addition, the budget control act gave a special committee the authority to reform the tax system and the entitlement system of the country and it said if you come to an agreement special committee, your action cannot be filibustered. you have to
station. he said three sthings, two of them were, it is very clear to the world that the united states has lost and that's why the united states as everyone knows, the united states is begging the taliban to come -- just sit down and negotiate with us. please. we know you've murdered thousands of americans. we get that. that's ok. just sit down with us. we'll keep releasing you murdering thugs if you just agree to sit down with us and talk. we'll even buy you a wonderful office in qatar so you will have international international prestige to spread whatever goodwill you wish to spread. that would be known, mr. speaker , the president would pay attention, that would be known as radical jihad. that is what they wish to spread. here's a news report today from from kabul, the u.s. has been secretly releasing captured taliban fighters from a detention center in afghanistan in a bid to strengthen its hand in peace talks with the insurgent group, the "washington post" reported monday. who in the world has ever studied history comes around and says we are releasing the murdering thugi
for a free irish republic meshes with the idea that the united states is a republic so it is very easy for irish people at least to imagine themselves as being good, loyal irish men and women and being good americans, the two identities are merging, coming together. >> would the americans have seen them pushing for a republic as proof that like not the civil rising mission but that they had improved the irish? >> there is some who -- yeah, the idea that them advocating for irish republic would be evidence of the irish moving up the ladder a little bit socially and civically and i think there is some of that and certainly people who argue a little later on that the irish progressed enough they can be considered legitimate american citizens. it is the other newcomers that arrived more recently that we have worry about, the new italians and eastern european jews and so forth and there is a little bit of that and this is an irish authored image that's being created here. irish sort of answering that charge that they're not good citizens, and so they do make the claim supporting a republic
a good republican citizen in the united states. other questions? does this make sense? we talked about on tuesday this idea of invented traditions and that's what's going on here. this is the st. patrick's day parade is a relatively new phenomenon in new york. you had parades by basically catholic churches on st. patrick's day going back to the late 18th century and tended to be a number of small parades by different churches in different parts of town. the first sort of all new york single st. patrick's day parade is 1848, just after you start to see the influx of the irish so it is a firly new tradition, the idea of a single irish march on this date. >> did the parade originate in ireland or in -- >> it is an irish custom as well, but it takes on particular meanings in the american context. joseph. >> is this parade organized by tammanee as well? >> no, it is organized by the ancient order of harburnians, the fraternal group. by the time you get to the 1870s and the wake of the civil war, irish americans were quite convinced they could be legitimately irish and legitimately american
. and the united states. so as i said at the beginning, 2010 was the summer of hate, two years ago. and you probably remember terry jones who promised to burn a copy of the quran. you might remember the beginning of an anti-sharia movement that pushes to pass legislation at a state level to ban sharia law, islamic law. it starts in oklahoma where there's this huge muslim population. no, there's knotts a huge miss -- there's not a huge muslim population in oklahoma. it's ridiculous, and the whole movement is ridiculous since there have been no cases of sharia law actually being cited with one exception in new jersey which was then overturned. and, of course, you remember that summer as well as two years before all of the rumors that obama, our president, is muslim. one-third of all republicans believed this according to polling at the time. one-quarter of the entire electorate believes this. and, of course, the ground zero mosque. the ground zero mosque becomes a political litmus test to determine how politicians stand on this key issue. mayor bloomberg, for it. newt gingrich, he's against i
bin laden and had great concerns about plotting attacks in the west, including in the united states. we know that a range of individuals like richard clarke were ringing alarm bells at the white house level. again, at that point, when we go back and look, it administration at that point was focused on things like the balkans and the kosovo war which was 1999. >> putting out fires elsewhere in the national security arena. >> yes. >> you talk about this wave of al qaeda violence. then they get beaten back. sometimes because of their own actions. what caused the temporary defeat the first time? was a launch into afghanistan? >> actually, it is almost the reverse of what we just outlined. the host that they had, the taliban regime, was overthrown. in addition to that, we saw the u.s. approach that was focused mostly on clandestine services. the cia come in a range of other intelligence services in a geospatial way, and special operations forces targeting in afghanistan and in afghanistan and other locations. >> we are talking about in 2001 how the united states fought back by sending in
the united states will be involved in afghanistan after u.s. troops leave the country in 2014. >> i've come to afghanistan to mark a short moment for our two nations. to do so on afghan soil. i'm here to affirm the bonds between our countries, to thank american and afghans who have sacrificed so much over these last ten years and to look forward to a future of peace and security and greater prosperity for our nations. >> we can expect to hear more about in his president's address coming up shortly. he addressed u.s. forces at the air babes and waded in the crowd for hand shakes, thanked them for all the sacrifices they have made. he said he could not be more proud to be their chief. ed, we're getting dribbles from the white house what the president will say tonight. >> we got a preview from the president himself as soon as me landed in afghanistan, basically he made some quick remarks we're saying that we did not choose this war. it came to us on 9/11. he also said the battle is not over but this is the beginning of the end basically of america's longest war. we got a preview there and also
the top counterterrorism threat to the nation. aqap has attempted several attacks on the united states in 2009 and 2010. we are currently exploiting an ied seized overseas which is similar to explosive devices used by aqap in the past. we also remain concerned about the threat from homegrown violent extremists. these individuals have no typical profile. their experience and motives are often distinct which make them difficult to find and difficult to stop. that may me turn next to counterintelligence. while we still confront additional s.b. notch, today's spies are students, researchers, business people or operators of front companies. they seek not only state secrets but also trade secrets, intellectual property and insider information from government, businesses and american universities. we are also seeing a growing insider threat. that is when employees use their legitimate access to steal secrets for the benefit of another company or another country. and of course the counterintelligence is now merging with the cyberthreat. so much sensitive data is stored on computer networks and
the best math scores. ...the united states would be on that list. in 25th place. let's raise academic standards across the nation. let's get back to the head of the class. let's solve this. >>> jack cafferty is here with "the cafferty file." jack? >> wolf, president obama's support for same-sex marriage is sure to fire up parts of the liberal base it could alienate other parts including black voters. in other words, backing gay marriage might be a risky proposition for the president in an election year when it comes to one of the core voting blocs. in 2008, you'll recall african-americans were crucial in making this president the first black president. 96% of black voters supported obama and they made up 13% of the electorate. fast forward four years approximately while polls suggest america on the whole is moving toward supporting same-sex marriage. nbc-washington post voting say 56 are opposed to it and this opposition from blacks could hurt the president especially in the south. just this week, north killer carol blacks voted two to one in favor of an amendment in that state bannin
. >>> the department of homeland security says 41 percent of illegal immigrants tried to reenter the united states after they had been deported. now u.s. customs and border patrol says it is cutting down that number to try something new. immigration rights advocates say it goes too far. casey ceiling reports from los angeles. >>> after a person is contracted to enter this country illegally they go through a fairly detailed process. their fingerprints, their identity is checked and then they are put into a data base. once officials determine they do not have a criminal background they are often taken into mexico where they started. kierding to u.s. customs and border protection roughly 41 percent of them are caught trying to come back to the united states at a later time. in tucson, arizona one of the busiest border patrol sectors some put immigrants on buses and transport them back to mexico by way of california and texas hundreds of miles away from their original point of entry. the concept is known adds lateral repatriation and the department of homeland security says it takes the recidivism rat
into the united states mostly from southern and eastern europe and mostly to cities on the eastern half of the united states. so the urban machines operating in those cities become almost overrun by these newcomers and don't have enough jobs and don't have enough favors and don't have enough money to do this. it is even harder now because it is harder to get a government job. one of the way that is reformers, critics who don't like the party machines try to under mine them is bypassing civil service laws, laws that require you to meet certain standards or pass a test in order to get a government job, so all of a sudden some of the jobs that used to be at the disposal of particular politicians no longer are. they become the something that you can only get through some kind of exam, some kind of process in which the politicians don't have the say as to who gets the job. my favorite story about this is one from boston in the early 20th century. there was an irish-american politic names james michael curley who would go onto not mayor of the city elected several times, would serve in congre
data in the united states. as well, concerns about jpmorgan. jamie dimon will have to explain himself in front of congress. the senate banking committee is calling on the jpmorgan chase chairman and ceo to testify next month on the company's big trading losses, now valued at possibly as high as $5 billion. the company has lost some $30 billion in market value in a week. >>> it looks like the possibility of additional economic stimulus by the federal reserve could be growing. the fed's open market committee releasing the minutes from the april meeting this week. more members of the fomc now say they are open to additional quantitative easing should the economy falter further. >>> retail sales meanwhile inched up in april. weak clothing and building material sales helping keep that number low. >>> facebook flies, the market tumbles. what happens if greece leaves the euro? a busy week and joining us to help explain what it means, richard bernstein, ceo of richard bernstein advisers. richard, always nice to have you on the program. >> thanks, maria. >> good to see you again. let's talk fa
republican seat. she will be a terrific general election candidate and a great addition to the united states senate. >> caller: she is running against a war hero, bob kerry, who is very popular. so this will be fascinating. >> it is interesting, the polls shower, even as not well known as she was, beating kerry handily, in large part because he has spent the better part of a decade, living in new york city, contemplating a run for mayor in new york city. that's not a good way to get favor in nebraska. >> greta: coming up, vice-president joe biden gets very loud. what got him so riled up? you have to hear the fiery speech. next. obamacare or no care? some college students are going to end up with no insurance. and the university president says the president's health care law is to blame. preliminary rivals or frenemmies. chris christie is teaming up with a democratic mayor. what is the duo up to? you have to see it to believe it. you do not want to miss this. what makes sam adams boston lager great is as simple as abc. a, the appearance. amber. [ jim ] b, balance. sam adams has malt sweetness
the massacre in houla friday. the united states signaled it would continue down the diplomatic path to end the bloodshed in syria. but right now the violence is expected to continue. bill: . there is a warning if diplomacy fails the wider region could be drawn into a bigger war. >> reporter: in israel there is a concern about what might happen next. susan rice was talking to the united nations saying if the larger diplomatic push fails, the wider region could be pulled into the conflict. the iranian government says if the united states or other countries intervene militarily in syria, israel will be attacked. there is a concern about israel and iran in terms of the nuclear issue. there is a lot of concern in the middle east about what happens next. right now it is a diplomatic push by the united states and the diplomatic community and the u.n. this seems to be the on real option anybody is considering. right now military intervention is off the table for most of the international community, bill. martha: with that violence escalating by the day, we are getting more images of the civilians
a request to leave china. he said he wanted to go to the united states. he said he could like to leave with hillary clinton on her plane. she's there for high level meetings. as we reported last night he phoned into an emergency congressional hearing that was called to discuss his case. he reiterated in the phone call that he wanted help from secretary clinton. it's all very dramatic. last night when we left this story it was totally up in the air as to what would happen on this today. the clock is ticking. today there does seem to be progress toward a new deal that could get him out of china and to the united states in way that did not escalate this any further. apparently he's now been offered a fellowship at nyu's law school. china said they will consider his request to become a student or a visiting lecturer. the u.s. government say they expect the request to be expedited. this is happening in the shadow of hillary clinton being in china. he's expected to depart on saturday local time but beijing is 12 hours ahead of east coast. she will be leaving momentarily. she will be leaving
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